The notion of feasting with the eyes is backed by the emotions that colours and shapes conjure. Whilst colours link to specific moods, shapes connect to underlying concepts. Extending beyond the range of ochres to yellow and almost orange, the natural colours of pastries and biscuits relate more to impulse than to rationale. Yellow is the colour of cheer, and orange is happiness. Edges and corners may feature more in experimental confectionery, but rounded forms associate with effortlessness. Pastries and biscuits thus represent food full of lively pleasure, being smooth and round in comforting colours.

 

Smell and sound, too, connect with emotion; in fact, even more than sight or touch does. Smells that bring back pleasant memories make us want to buy, and music pulls at the heartstrings. The linking is owed to olfactory memory, created by parts of the body working together from the nose to the limbic system. When the aroma of pastries and biscuits waft by and we take a bite, we are transported to a time in the past that was always better as we remember it now.

 

Sound may be the forgotten flavour yet without fail we associate crunchiness with freshness. Who doesn’t like the crusty end of a baguette, or love biscuits that break with a crack? On the other hand, softness represents pleasantness. Crispy on the outside but fluffy on the inside makes for a successful pastry formula.

 

Human pleasure sensors seem to be activated mostly by something sweet. A sweet face, a sweet feeling, sweetness of character or tone of voice all attract likes. Too sweet may be unpopular in taste but a little sugary sweetness is mostly welcome. Over the added chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla, sweetness is the common success factor to both pastries and biscuits.

 

Across many cultures, food is an expression of love. Many who experience difficulty expressing their feelings find solace in baked goods doing a great job on their behalf. And whilst being present with what you are creating - an act of mindfulness - gives the incidental bonus of reducing stress, there is also an altruistic side to baking. Read about it in this MSU Story.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Semanisiman by patisserie entrepreneur Shafikah Nuriman Md Nazri from MSU’s Bachelor in Patisserie Arts (Hons) programme.

 

MSU Bachelor in Patisserie Arts (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Patisserie Arts

MSU Bachelor in Culinary Arts (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Culinary Arts

MSU Bachelor in Food Service Technology (Hons)

MSU Master in Food Service Technology (by Research)

MSU PhD in Food Service Technology

 

 

 

 

 



The notion of feasting with the eyes is backed by the emotions that colours and shapes conjure. Whilst colours link to specific moods, shapes connect to underlying concepts. Extending beyond the range of ochres to yellow and almost orange, the natural colours of pastries and biscuits relate more to impulse than to rationale. Yellow is the colour of cheer, and orange is happiness. Edges and corners may feature more in experimental confectionery, but rounded forms associate with effortlessness. Pastries and biscuits thus represent food full of lively pleasure, being smooth and round in comforting colours.

 

Smell and sound, too, connect with emotion; in fact, even more than sight or touch does. Smells that bring back pleasant memories make us want to buy, and music pulls at the heartstrings. The linking is owed to olfactory memory, created by parts of the body working together from the nose to the limbic system. When the aroma of pastries and biscuits waft by and we take a bite, we are transported to a time in the past that was always better as we remember it now.

 

Sound may be the forgotten flavour yet without fail we associate crunchiness with freshness. Who doesn’t like the crusty end of a baguette, or love biscuits that break with a crack? On the other hand, softness represents pleasantness. Crispy on the outside but fluffy on the inside makes for a successful pastry formula.

 

Human pleasure sensors seem to be activated mostly by something sweet. A sweet face, a sweet feeling, sweetness of character or tone of voice all attract likes. Too sweet may be unpopular in taste but a little sugary sweetness is mostly welcome. Over the added chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla, sweetness is the common success factor to both pastries and biscuits.

 

Across many cultures, food is an expression of love. Many who experience difficulty expressing their feelings find solace in baked goods doing a great job on their behalf. And whilst being present with what you are creating - an act of mindfulness - gives the incidental bonus of reducing stress, there is also an altruistic side to baking. Read about it in this MSU Story.

 

 

Photos courtesy of Semanisiman by patisserie entrepreneur Shafikah Nuriman Md Nazri from MSU’s Bachelor in Patisserie Arts (Hons) programme.

 

MSU Bachelor in Patisserie Arts (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Patisserie Arts

MSU Bachelor in Culinary Arts (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Culinary Arts

MSU Bachelor in Food Service Technology (Hons)

MSU Master in Food Service Technology (by Research)

MSU PhD in Food Service Technology