Humans are wired to seek consolation in tactile qualities, and objects of craft continue to provide them. The skills of craft-making, however, do not happen overnight. Appreciating heritage on National Craft Day 2020 early last March were students from Management and Science University (MSU) Learning Centre (MLC) in KL Sentral.

 

 

Visiting the Craft Complex in Conlay Road, Kuala Lumpur on invitation by the Malaysian Handicraft Development Corporation – which is under the purview of the Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture Malaysia – the mixed full-time and full-time-weekend students from the Diploma in Management, Diploma in Graphic Design, Diploma in Early Childhood Education, and Diploma in Public Relations and Entertainment Management programmes were directed to the complex’s Craft Museum first; where they saw various craft items featuring heritage characteristics, and took in the history behind each.

 

 

Beyond their utility, craft objects are things that embody memories, milestones, and a little of who we are. Living their lives as our possessions owned by self-acquisition or inherited throughout generations, they mark time as we pass it. The traditional, tradesman-way they were crafted provides a clue to how our ancestors made things; which is with a pleasure un-replicated by machination’s pressing of the start button.

 

Craft-making presents a fascinating link between the how-to of the present and of the past. The intricacies to making handmade pieces are craft’s lessons on working hard at learning a skill and treasuring it once gained. In an age where instant gratification is the norm, and code-writing skill is more widespread than that of needle-threading, for example, craft’s design concepts and eye-to-hand coordination are compelling experiences destined to develop patience and an attention to detail in those learning a particular craft.

 

 

At the next stop, which was the National Craft Institute, the students tried their hand at pottery, copper-plate drawing, and batik printing or canting.

 

 

The take-home lesson of the day being about connecting – to one’s self, to nature, and to your place in it – the learning experience also demonstrated that although craft-making may be seen as a standalone skill with which one goes out and gets employed, it can in fact also be a spiritual journey leading to a joy in creating as you build confidence along with competence.

 

 

MSU Bachelor in Accessories Design (Hons)

MSU Bachelor in Fashion Design with Marketing (Hons)

MSU Bachelor in Education (Visual Arts) (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Creative Visual

MSU Diploma in Interior Design

MSU Foundation in Visual Arts

 

 



Humans are wired to seek consolation in tactile qualities, and objects of craft continue to provide them. The skills of craft-making, however, do not happen overnight. Appreciating heritage on National Craft Day 2020 early last March were students from Management and Science University (MSU) Learning Centre (MLC) in KL Sentral.

 

 

Visiting the Craft Complex in Conlay Road, Kuala Lumpur on invitation by the Malaysian Handicraft Development Corporation – which is under the purview of the Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture Malaysia – the mixed full-time and full-time-weekend students from the Diploma in Management, Diploma in Graphic Design, Diploma in Early Childhood Education, and Diploma in Public Relations and Entertainment Management programmes were directed to the complex’s Craft Museum first; where they saw various craft items featuring heritage characteristics, and took in the history behind each.

 

 

Beyond their utility, craft objects are things that embody memories, milestones, and a little of who we are. Living their lives as our possessions owned by self-acquisition or inherited throughout generations, they mark time as we pass it. The traditional, tradesman-way they were crafted provides a clue to how our ancestors made things; which is with a pleasure un-replicated by machination’s pressing of the start button.

 

Craft-making presents a fascinating link between the how-to of the present and of the past. The intricacies to making handmade pieces are craft’s lessons on working hard at learning a skill and treasuring it once gained. In an age where instant gratification is the norm, and code-writing skill is more widespread than that of needle-threading, for example, craft’s design concepts and eye-to-hand coordination are compelling experiences destined to develop patience and an attention to detail in those learning a particular craft.

 

 

At the next stop, which was the National Craft Institute, the students tried their hand at pottery, copper-plate drawing, and batik printing or canting.

 

 

The take-home lesson of the day being about connecting – to one’s self, to nature, and to your place in it – the learning experience also demonstrated that although craft-making may be seen as a standalone skill with which one goes out and gets employed, it can in fact also be a spiritual journey leading to a joy in creating as you build confidence along with competence.

 

 

MSU Bachelor in Accessories Design (Hons)

MSU Bachelor in Fashion Design with Marketing (Hons)

MSU Bachelor in Education (Visual Arts) (Hons)

MSU Diploma in Creative Visual

MSU Diploma in Interior Design

MSU Foundation in Visual Arts